World Reached 17.5% Green Energy In 2015, But Falls Short On Energy SDGs

The world is lagging on its global energy targets for 2030 set as part of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), but progress is being made in certain areas, according to a new report.

As of 2015, the world obtained 17.5 per cent of its total final energy consumption from renewable sources, of which 9.6 per cent represents modern forms of renewable energy such as geothermal, hydropower, solar and wind, said the ‘Tracking SDG7: The Energy Progress Report’ from five international agencies.

Based on current policies, the renewable share is expected to reach just 21 per cent by 2030, with modern renewables growing to 15 per cent, falling short of the ‘substantial’ increase demanded by the SDGs target, it said.

“Falling costs, technological improvements and enabling frameworks are fuelling an unprecedented growth of renewable energy, which is expanding energy access, improving health outcomes, and helping to tackle climate change, while also creating jobs and powering sustainable economic growth,” said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “At the same time, this tracking report is an important signal that we must be more ambitious in harnessing the power of renewable energy and take more deliberate action to achieve the SDGs.”

Renewable energy is making impressive gains in the electricity sector, however, these wins are not being matched in transportation and heating, which together account for 80 per cent of global energy consumption, according to the report.

Renewable energy is making impressive gains in the electricity sector, however, these wins are not being matched in transportation and heating, which together account for 80 per cent of global energy consumption, according to the report.

Dr Fatih Birol, executive director of the International Energy Agency (IEA), said: “There is an urgent need for action on all technologies, especially on renewables and energy efficiency, which are key for delivering on three critical goals – energy access, climate mitigation and lower air pollution.”

The report’s findings are based on official national-level data and measure global progress up to 2015 for renewable energy and energy efficiency, and to 2016 for access to electricity and clean cooking.

KEY REPORT FINDINGS:

Renewable energy

  • As of 2015, the world obtained 17.5 per cent of its total final energy consumption from renewable sources, of which 9.6 per cent represents modern forms of renewable energy such as geothermal, hydropower, solar and wind. The remainder is traditional uses of biomass (such as fuelwood and charcoal).
  • Based on current policies, the renewable share is expected to reach just 21 per cent by 2030, with modern renewables growing to 15 per cent, falling short of the substantial increase demanded by the SDG7 target.
  • Rapidly falling costs have allowed solar and wind to compete with conventional power generation sources in multiple regions, driving the growth in the share of renewables in electricity to 22.8 per cent in 2015. But electricity accounted for only 20 per cent of total final energy consumption that year, highlighting the need to accelerate progress in transport and heating.
  • The share of renewable energy in transport is rising quite rapidly, but from a very low base, amounting to only 2.8 per cent in 2015. The use of renewable energy for heating purposes has barely increased in recent years and stood at 24.8 per cent in 2015, of which one third was from modern uses.
  • Since 2010, China’s progress in renewable energy alone accounted for nearly 30 per cent of absolute growth in renewable energy consumption globally in 2015.

Energy efficiency

  • There is mounting evidence of the uncoupling of growth and energy use. Global gross domestic product (GDP) grew nearly twice as fast as primary energy supply in 2010-15. Economic growth outpaced growth in energy use in all regions, except for Western Asia, where GDP is heavily tied to energy-intensive industries, and in all income groups.
  • Globally, energy intensity – the ratio of energy used per unit of GDP – fell at an accelerating pace of 2.8 per cent in 2015, the fastest decline since 2010.  This improved the average annual decline in energy intensity to 2.2 per cent for the period 2010-2015.
  • Six of the 20 countries that represent 80 per cent of the world’s total primary energy supply, including Japan and the US, reduced their annual primary energy supply in 2010-15 while continuing to grow GDP – indicating a peak in energy use. Among the large energy-intensive developing economies, China and Indonesia stood out with annual improvement exceeding three per cent.

Access to electricity

  • Around one billion people – or 13 per cent of the world’s population – still live without electricity. Sub-Saharan Africa, and Central and South Asia continue to be the areas of the world with the largest access deficits. Almost 87 per cent of the world’s people without electricity live in rural areas.
  • The number of people gaining access to power has been accelerating since 2010, but needs to ramp up further to achieve universal access to electricity by 2030. If current trends continue, an estimated 674 million people will still live without electricity in 2030.
  • Some of the strongest gains were made in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania, which all increased their electricity access rate by three per cent or more annually between 2010 and 2016. Over the same period, India provided electricity to 30 million people annually, more than any other country. Sub-Saharan Africa’s electrification deficit has begun to fall in absolute terms for the first time.

Clean cooking

  • Three billion people – or more than 40 per cent of the world’s population – do not have access to clean cooking fuels and technologies. Household air pollution from burning biomass for cooking and heating is responsible for some four million deaths a year, with women and children at the greatest risk.

Tracking SDG7: The Energy Progress Report is a joint effort of the International Energy Agency (IEA), the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), the World Bank, and the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


About us

Impact4All is designed to deliver the full spectrum of news, analysis and connectivity that allows all players and audiences to become informed and participate at any level in the new energy sector. It is designed to break down barriers between audiences, activists and investors.

Impact4All.org is currently developing and preparing to deploy a best in class, multi-level, universally accessible tender, transaction and e-commerce facility (I4A.exchange). This has been designed and built for all participants, at all levels within the ecosystem of renewable energy and resource management investments. This platform will allow contacts and connections to be facilitated more efficiently, accelerating climate solution projects globally.





Newsletter



CONTACT US

Print Friendly, PDF & Email